Tag Archives: lora cantele

The Benefits of a Hot Mineral Bath

A_hot_spring_bath_-tshushimaTaking a mineral bath can be very relaxing and revitalizing to the skin. Bathing in hot water not only increases your body temperature, it also increases metabolism and white blood cell count, and helps detoxification and aids sleep. The addition of mineral salts and trace elements will soften the water, draw out toxins and revitalize the skin by replacing minerals lost through detoxification. These minerals are vital as they can soothe painful joints and muscles (calcium and magnesium); calm nerve pain, soothe and tighten skin, and improve circulation in cases of arthritis (magnesium); reduce stress and relieve anxiety by lowering blood pressure (magnesium and potassium); improve muscle contraction and the proper functioning of nerve impulses (sodium and sodium chloride); soothes painful muscles (sodium chloride).

Hot baths (100-104° F), while highly therapeutic, are not for everyone and should be employed by individuals with abnormal blood pressure, heart problems, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, seizure disorder. They are also not for children, pregnant women, elderly or obese patients and supervision is recommended.

KuroganeHot_springs_bath_紫煙

Kugane Hot Springs Bath by 紫煙

The addition of essential oils can increase the pleasure and therapeutic benefit of a hot bath. Adding the essential oils to hot water will simply cause the volatile oils to evaporate quickly. While they are not fatty oils, such as olive or grapseed oil, essential oils are somewhat oily and are not diluted by the water. They are best dispersed by adding four to six drops of essential oil to a teaspoon of milk, cream or honey and adding them into the bath water when the tub is full.

Aromatic essential oils such as Sandalwood, Vetiver, Patchouli or Lavender can help to encourage relaxation, aid sleep, and provide support for the adrenal glands. Floral aromas including Geranium, Ylang Ylang and Rose invoke a heady feeling of euphoria and comfort. Warming oils of Ginger, Black Pepper and Juniper can help to improve circulation and provide relief in cases of arthritis.

You can make your own Sea Salt bath by adding 25 drops of your favorite essential oils to two teaspoons of grapeseed oil. Be sure to mix them well. Then combine one cup each baking soda and Dead Sea salts and the essential oil blend and mix thoroughly. Store in a 16 ounce airtight jar. This makes enough for four mineral baths (1/2 cup each).

Sleep Easy Blend

9 drops Lavender essential oil                                                                                                     9 drops Roman Chamomile essential oil                                                                                   7 drops Sweet Marjoram essential oil                                                                                         2 tsp. (10 ml) Grapseed oil

1 cup (8 oz) Baking Soda                                                                                                               1 cup (8 oz) Dead Sea Salts

Blend the essential oils with the grapeseed oil. In a large non-reactive bowl combine the baking soda and Dead Sea salts. Add the essential oil blend and mix very well.  Store in a 16 ounce airtight jar or container.

Fill the bath tub with hot water. Add 1/2 cup of the prepared salts and swish around the tub to dissolve. Slip into the tub and enjoy.

Lora Cantele

Co-author of The Complete Aromatherapy & Essential Oils Handbook for Everyday Wellness

 

 

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Summer Sweetness of Linden

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Linden flowers (and bract – the leaf-like structure attached to the flowers) make a beautiful and delicate tea that eases tension and anxiety and has an overall calming effect to the body, making it an excellent evening tea to aid sleep .  It can also be used to ease muscle tension, headaches and menstrual pain.  It has an affinity for the heart and is an amazing heart tonic on all levels.  It lowers blood pressure and can help arteriosclerosis and works well in combination with Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) for heart conditions. Emotionally, the two combined can ease heartache and help heal a broken heart. Traditionally, Linden was used to treat epilepsy and convulsions.

Try these recipes…

Linden Cooler

Recipe by Erin Smith

1 part Linden Tea (you can use fresh or dried linden flowers)
1 part Lemonade
Sliced strawberries (to taste)

If possible, make the linden tea the night before, allowing it to infuse overnight. Strain and combine with the lemonade in a large pitcher. Add the strawberries; if wanting a stronger strawberry flavor fill a 1/4 of the pitcher with slices. Add ice and serve.

Linden infused honey

1 part linden flowers
1 part raw local honey

Place your fresh linden flowers in a glass jar. While the bract is also traditionally used for medicinal purposes, using only the fresh flowers will make a stronger flavored honey.  Cover with honey.  Make sure that the flowers are completely submerged in honey. The flowers will tend to sit at the top for the first few days.  If after a few days, they are still not submerged, add more honey until they are covered. Allow to sit for 2-6 weeks and use as desired.  The flowers will become candied and are delicious on their own.  If you wish to remove the flowers after infusing, then place the flowers in a make-shift tea bag made out of cheesecloth and place in jar (with the edges sticking out of the top so it will be easy to remove later). Cover with honey.  After it has infused, lightly warm the honey (do not over heat) until it has a more liquid consistency and remove the “tea bag”.  For a lighter flavored honey, cut the amount of flowers used in half.

For more delicious ways to use herbs in food, check out Erin Smith’s Herbal Kitchen program in Boulder on July 17th.

The Van Dyke

Recipe by Michael Heim

2 oz Bombay Sapphire Gin
0.5 oz fresh lemon juice
0.5 oz linden infused honey syrup (3:1 honey:water)
1 Bar spoon of house grapefruit bitters.
Shaken, double strained up in a chilled coupe glass

For more information about Linden/Lime (Tilia spp.) check out The Center for Integrative Botanical Studies Newsletter at http://www.integrativebotanical.com/plant-of-the-month-july/

Image:  Linden blossoms and leaves Copyright All rights reserved by Jude’s Jewels /Flickr.com