Tag Archives: International journal of professional holistic aromatherapy

Advancing Clinical Aromatherapy Education in Women’s Health

pam-conradPam Conrad Discusses Her New Evidence-Based Program

Interview by Leslie Moldenauer CHNC, HHP, Cert. Aroma

Pam Conrad, PGd, BSN, RN, CCAP, earned her Bachelor of Science Nursing degree from Purdue University and has been a registered nurse for over 25 years. Pam completed R J Buckle and Associates 18-month Clinical Aromatherapy course for healthcare professionals in 2000. Pam’s focus in Aromatherapy has always been integrative; combining time-honored nursing and clinical Aromatherapy.

Upon completion of Dr. Buckle’s course, her family moved to England for two years where she studied advanced Aromatherapy with nurses and midwives, and completed a Post Graduate Diploma in Complementary Studies at the University of Westminster Graduate School of Integrated Health, in London. This is where Pam met Denise Tiran and Ethel Burns–two of her mentors–who both specialize in Aromatherapy and pregnancy/childbirth and postpartum. Pam became Ms. Tiran’s first international intern and was able to learn first-hand how to integrate complementary Aromatherapy alongside her traditional practice.

In 2008, Pam taught a group of 12 obstetrics (OB) nurses evidence-based clinical Aromatherapy and developed the first hospital OB Aromatherapy program in the United States (Burns et al., 2000 and 2007).  Since that time, multiple hospitals in Indiana (and now Santiago, Chile) have completed this course and developed clinical programs.

Pam currently has the only evidenced-based women’s health/ maternity/clinical Aromatherapy course in the United States that is approved by the American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA).

LM: Pam, let’s talk a bit more about your evidence-based program being taught here in America. This is a substantial advancement for the industry. What makes your course unique? What is your course offering to potential students?

PC: Historically, the class has been nurses and nurse midwives. The program has recently extended to teach certified doulas as well as certified Aromatherapists. The International Journal of Professional Holistic Aromatherapy will be hosting the first class that includes certified Aromatherapists in February 2017.

The course is focused on labor, childbirth and postpartum. As new clinical evidence emerges, the course content is revised with Aromatherapy interventions for the nine months of pregnancy.

The program takes a clinical approach, which stands out from what is currently being taught in the United States. There are many factors that come into play when making a clinical decision with a patient, not just looking at the chemistry of a particular essential oil. We teach everyone how to analyze the person standing in front of them, looking at their medical history, medications, and to discern how they have responded to different therapies over the course of their lives. Some people react paradoxically to a therapy or an essential oil, this is taken into consideration as well. The clinical judgment and knowledge along with the property of the oils backed by evidence-based research is the basis of how the students are taught.

Another aspect that is covered in great detail is knowing how to decide which women are good candidates for Aromatherapy and which ones are not. We look at possible issues surrounding the neonate, so we teach what should be done for the mom with the baby as well as separate of the baby, in other words without baby present in the room.

In taking this well-rounded and evidence-based clinical approach, I believe that the program is incredibly unique, and very important to the community at large.

LM: Pregnancy and childbirth has until very recently carried with it a stigma, viewing it as a medical condition, rather than a natural and beautiful part of life. Can you talk briefly about how Aromatherapy is being used to facilitate the birthing process?

PC: Pregnancy, labor and childbirth are a beautiful and natural process for the female body. In normal healthy pregnancies, our bodies are well designed to adjust the many functions of our bodies as well as accommodate the growth and development of a fetus. Healthy nutrition, rest, and regular exercise can accomplish this task. At times women do become so uncomfortable with nausea, ingestion, stress, and aches and pains that Aromatherapy is a good choice. Occasional, very dilute and select essential oils used externally; i.e. Lemon (Citrus limon), Lavender (Lavandula angustofolia), and Red Mandarin (Citrus reticulata) have been very effective in our programs.

Unlike what seems like a popular notion, there is no need to help start the labor process. Utilizing Clary sage (Salvia sclerea) for example, is being overused with the idea that a therapist or a nurse can get labor started. This area needs to be understood more fully. If the mother is already in labor, there is no need to increase the contractions. This actually causes what is called hyper-contractions from uterine hyperstimulation (a potential complication of labor induction). This could create a risk for the mother or baby, especially if there are conditions such as cord around the babies neck, placenta previa1 or abrupto.2

The overall goal is to make the mother more comfortable. The more relaxed and comfortable she is, the more likely that natural labor is going to progress, as it should.

LM: Lavender was at one time considered an emmenagogue (uterine stimulant) and was considered contraindicated during pregnancy. In his book, Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Ed., Robert Tisserand dismissed this as a myth as he found no credible research to support that. Recently there has been some debate over this topic. Where do you currently stand on the issue?

PC: There have been some changes recently as far as opinions surrounding Lavender. The experts that I refer to are the clinical experts. When it comes to Aromatherapy, we all find a place to work from that we feel most comfortable, based on our own professional background. Being in the medical field for decades, I focus on the clinical experts and the evidence base, as well as our patient responses. Since beginning our program, we have collected patient data from over 1500 OB hospital interventions.

Historically, the agreement between Ethel Burns and Denise Tiran has been no topical application of Lavender until after the 24th week of pregnancy. The percentage for an acceptable essential oil during pregnancy is 0.5-1%. Once term labor begins this can be increased to 2%. This is a fraction of the dilution that you may have seen recommended often times in the industry.

In a clinical setting, when working with someone who has previous medical conditions or any other red flags; i.e. past miscarriages, in vitro fertilization (IVF),  multiples (twins, triplets,etc.) various blood lab abnormalities, high or low blood pressure, and swelling, the decision to be more conservative with Aromatherapy is recommended. For someone with no red flags, a decision may be made to use Lavender at the dilutions mentioned above before the 24-week mark. At that point, the only Lavender that would be used is Lavandula angustifolia, as ketones are a concern with other varieties of Lavender. If the soon-to-be-mother is going through such a high level of stress that it is insurmountable and puts a risk on the pregnancy and she needs help, Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) may be used.

As long as the mother is not allergic to or dislikes Lavender, it can be used throughout labor and postpartum for anxiety and pain. Red Mandarin is also very helpful for anxiety, indigestion, and nausea and is emotionally uplifting.

As a nurse for many years, the clinical perspective, patient care experience and evidence base all play a part in my practice and courses.

LM:  I would like to talk a little bit about your 2012 study conducted with Cindy Adams, “The effects of clinical Aromatherapy for anxiety and depression in the high risk postpartum woman.” Can you tell us a little bit about that clinical study?

The aim of the study was to determine if Aromatherapy is effective at improving anxiety and depression in women at high risk of postpartum depression. It was a study that included 28 women who were all 0-18 months postpartum. The treatment groups were randomized to either inhalation or the Aromatherapy ‘M’ Technique. The treatment consisted of 15 min sessions, twice per week for four consecutive week using a 2% blend of Rose (Rosa damascena) otto and Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). The non-randomized group avoided all Aromatherapy during this same time period. Allopathic treatment continued for all of the participants.

All subjects completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and

Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) at the beginning of the study. The scales were then repeated at the midway point (two weeks), and at the end of all treatments (four weeks).

No significant differences were found between Aromatherapy and control groups at baseline. However, the midpoint and final scores indicated that Aromatherapy had significant improvements greater than the control group on both EPDS and GAD-7 scores. No adverse effects were reported.

The study shows that Aromatherapy is very effective and safe as a complementary therapy in both anxiety and depression with postpartum women.

LM: What do you hope to see for the future of Aromatherapy? What other areas of support for women are you hoping to target in the near future?

Where I see the greatest importance for Aromatherapy during this passage of life is during the post-partum phase and early motherhood. The ability to identify a mom who is at risk for post-partum depression (PPD) is crucial. We can work with them to using Aromatherapy and other complementary therapies to help avoid PPD. We demonstrated the empowering use of the essential oil on mothers and their children in our published pilot study (Conrad and Adams, 2012).

The time during pregnancy and labor is the perfect time to teach a woman how to properly take care of herself during the post-partum period and beyond. When we are able to work as a team, thereby giving us nine months to provide the education to the mom as a complement to their care, greatly increases their quality of life. A mom can then to go to Aromatherapy first, rather than medical treatments, after birth. The postpartum period involves the mother navigating through a myriad of changes, both emotionally and physically. Aromatic complementary therapies can be a perfect stand alone support during the postpartum period for some women. In others, when medication is indicated, it can further support the mother physically and emotionally to improve her quality of life in early motherhood.

The IJPHA is proud to present Pam’s course in Women’s Health for Aromatherapists, nurses, nurse Aromatherapists, midwives, and doulas February 4-5, 2017 in Boulder, Colorado. For information about this program and to register, visit the IJPHA website at http://www.ijpha.com.

[1] Placenta previa is a problem of pregnancy in which the placenta grows in the lowest part of the womb (uterus) and covers all or part of the opening to the cervix.

[2] Placenta abrupto is when the placenta detaches from the wall of the womb (uterus) before delivery.

References

Burns E et al.. (2000). An investigation into the use of Aromatherapy in intrapartum midwifery practice. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 6 (2), p141-147.

Burns E, Zobbi V, Panzeri D, Oskrochi R, Regalia A. (2007). Aromatherapy in childbirth: a pilot randomised controlled trial. BJOG. 114 (7), p838-844.

Conrad P and Adams C. (2012). The effects of clinical Aromatherapy for anxiety and depression in the high risk postpartum woman-A pilot study. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 18 (3), 164-168.

Leslie Moldenauer has been studying natural living and holistic wellness for over 10 years. She is the owner of Lifeholistically.com, a trusted resource that covers essential oil safety and encompasses all that natural living has to offer. Leslie is passionate about providing education and tools to help others make decisions regarding safety above all things when utilizing aromatherapy in the home. Leslie earned her degree in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) at the American College of Healthcare Sciences in Portland, Oregon. She is currently earning an advanced diploma in Aromatic Medicine with Mark Webb (Australia), and has trained with Aromatherapy researcher and educator Robert Tisserand.

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10 Essential Steps to Become a Registered Aromatherapist (RA)

*This article was written by Dorene Petersen and first appeared on the ACHS Health and Wellness Blog here: http://info.achs.edu/blog/10-essential-steps-to-become-a-registered-aromatherapist-ra

dorene-petersen_largeOne of the most frequently asked questions I hear from America College of Healthcare Sciences students, graduates, and aroma-enthusiasts is: How do I become a Registered Aromatherapist (RA)?

As you may already know, an RA is an aromatherapist who has successfully demonstrated a core body of aromatherapy knowledge by passing the Aromatherapy Registration Council’s (ARC) Examination. The ARC RA Examination’s primary focus is the safe administration of essential oils and covers topics such as scientific principles, administration, and professional issues in aromatherapy. It is also available in a number of languages, including English, Japanese, and Korean. In mid-2015, it will be available in Chinese.

Once you have successfully passed the ARC RA Examination, you are added to the online international database of ARC Registered Aromatherapists. The RA registration (which is valid for five years) confirms your high standard of aromatherapy education and demonstrates a commitment to the ethical, safe use and administration of essential oils when working with the public.

An additional perk: the ARC will also verify your registration status at the request of employers, government agencies, and anyone who needs to verify your professional qualifications.

But how do you become a Registered Aromatherapist (RA)? Here are 10 essential steps to take to become a Registered Aromatherapist:

Step 1 – Ask Yourself: Am I Qualified to take the ARC Exam?

The very first step before applying for any credential is to ask one simple question: do I meet the qualifications? All students, including international students, can sit for the ARC RA Examination if they:

  • Complete a minimum of 200 hours in a Level II or III aromatherapy program that is in compliance with the current National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) or Alliance of International Aromatherapists (AIA) Educational Guidelines or provide evidence of equivalent training (be sure you include your transcripts and/or syllabi in your application). If you are not sure that your school’s curriculum is covered in the “core body of knowledge,” download the ARC’s Candidate Handbook. You can also encourage your school or aromatherapy training institute to submit final examination questions confidentially to Professional Testing Corporation (PTC) who oversee the exam administration and management.
  • Agree to adhere to the full Disciplinary Policy
  • Complete and file the Application for ARC Registration Examination in Aromatherapy
  • Pay the required fees

Step 2 – Check the Upcoming Application and Examination Dates

Next, you’ll want to make sure you’ve marked the upcoming Application Deadlines and Examination dates on your calendar. The ARC has these dates listed on their website here: http://aromatherapycouncil.org/?page_id=86, and I have also posted a graphic with the upcoming dates below:

ARC Application Deadlines

Step 3 – Download the Candidate Handbook

The Candidate Handbook is a must-have resource when preparing for the ARC Exam. You can download your copy from the PTC’s website here.

The Candidate Handbook will help you understand:

  • The ARC’s mission
  • How to apply to take the Exam
  • How the Exam is scored
  • How you will receive your results
  • The content of the Exam
  • Instructions for re-taking the Exam
  • Fees and refunds
  • How to schedule your Exam appointment
  • Plus it will give you examples of Exam questions!

Step 4 – Study and Prepare for the Exam

Once you’ve reviewed the Candidate Handbook, you’ll have a good idea of what to expect on the Examination. From there, you can continue to study the relevant course materials you’ve saved from your Level II or III aromatherapy program. You can also check out the recommended reading on page 10 of the Candidate Handbook.

The ARC Examination is a computer or a paper-and-pencil examination (with a score of 70% or higher to pass) composed of a maximum of 250 multiple choice questions with a total testing time of four hours. Need some practice questions? Don’t forget to utilize the sample questions in the Candidate Handbook.

The content of the Exam will be weighted approximately based on the following topics:

I. Basic Concepts of Aromatherapy…………………………. 20%

II. Scientific Principles……………………………………………. 30%

III. Administration ………………………………………………….. 35%

IV. Professional Issues ……………………………………………. 15%

As an educator, I know studying takes a lot of time and energy. Don’t forget to maintain your health and wellness while preparing for the Exam:

  • Take a 10 minute break for every hour of study time
  • Reward yourself for a good study session
  • Diffuse your favorite invigorating essential oils in your study space (I love rosemaryRosmarinus officinalis (L.) and bergamot Citrus aurantium (L.) var. bergamia)
  • Maintain balanced, holistic nutrition
  • Drink plenty of water—hydration is good for the brain!

Step 5 – Fill Out Your Application and Pay Required Fees

There are three documents you’ll need to complete your application (the Application and Consent form can be found in your Candidate Handbook):

  1. ARC Disciplinary Policy (you must agree to this policy on your application)
  2. Application for ARC Registration Examination in Aromatherapy, mark the language you prefer, English, Japanese, or Korean (the Japanese and Korean exams are only paper-and-pencil based)
  3. Candidate Consent Form

Reminder: Don’t forget to include your transcripts and/or syllabi from your Level II or Level III aromatherapy program.

The application fee for the exam is $325. You have a few options when paying your exam fee. You can:

  1. Pay by check or money order: Make payable to: PROFESSIONAL TESTING CORPORATION and include in your application packet.
  1. Pay by card: Visa, MasterCard, and American Express are also accepted, and you can complete the Credit Card Payment section on the Application.

DO NOT send cash—be sure to pay through one of the two options listed above.

Step 6 – Send In Your Application

Once you’ve completed your application, it’s time to send it in. Complete your application online or mail your application to PTC at this address:

Professional Testing Corporation
1350 Broadway, 17th Floor
New York, NY 10018

The next ARC application deadline is March 1, 2015, so it’s time to begin gathering your materials and preparing for the Examination (as I mentioned above, the upcoming dates can be found here: http://aromatherapycouncil.org/?page_id=86).

Step 7 – Sit for Your Exam

Now it’s time to take your exam! Once you’ve submitted your application, PTC will contact you within six weeks with an Eligibility Notice.

The Eligibility Notice will tell you how to schedule your examination appointment, and it will also remind you of the available exam dates. The ARC Examination is offered during an established two-week testing period, Monday through Saturday, excluding holidays. You may have different instructions if you are taking the paper-based exam in Japanese or Korean, so be sure to read your Eligibility Notice carefully.

Remember: Exam appointment times are first-come, first-served, so schedule your appointment as soon as you receive your Eligibility Notice. This will increase your chances of being able to take the exam at your preferred location and time. To find a testing center near you, visit www.ptcny.com/cbt/sites.htm or call PSI Exams Online at (800) 733-9267.

Once you’ve scheduled your appointment, PSI will send you a confirmation email with the date, time, and location of your exam. Be sure to review this information carefully, and contact PSI immediately if you notice any errors.

Remember to plan accordingly on the day of your exam: The exam is proctored and you are not permitted to leave the room (even for a toilet break!), so be prepared. You are not permitted to take any paper, books, or iPhones into the examination room.

Be sure to get plenty of sleep the night before, drink lots of water, eat a nutritious breakfast, and allow for adequate travel time so you arrive at your examination center on time and ready to succeed! Don’t try to “study crunch” the night before. If you’ve taken the time to study in the weeks leading up to the exam, you’re already set up for success.

Step 8 – Receive Your Exam Grades and Registry Notification

Once you have completed your exam it will be sent to PTC for grading. If you’ve successfully passed the exam, PTC will notify the ARC that you are successful candidate (congratulations!). The ARC will then prepare a Registration Certificate and update the Register. This process can take four to six weeks.

If you’ve passed the Exam, your test results and your Registration packet will be mailed to you. As a successful registrant, make sure to email the ARC to confirm any details you would like listed on the Register. The ARC will automatically list your name and address, but you can also request to have your website, phone number, and email included on your listing.

You can find the current listing of Registered Aromatherapists (RA) here:http://aromatherapycouncil.org/?page_id=88. Remember, as a Registered Aromatherapist, you are responsible for ensuring your information on the Register is accurate and up-to-date. If your information changes you will find the form to submit updates here http://www.ptcny.net/clients/ARC/RA/Member/DisplayRA.aspx

As I mentioned above, one perk of passing the Examination and becoming an RA is that the ARC will verify your registration status at the request of employers, government agencies, the public, or anyone with whom you wish to share your new credential.

The ARC will only release your RA status, the date your registration was awarded, and any disciplinary actions taken by the ARC.

Step 9 – Utilize Your New RA Credential!

Now that you are a Registered Aromatherapist (RA), you have many options for putting your new credential into action. As an RA, you can…

  • Teach clients how to achieve and sustain good health on a daily basis by incorporating essential oils into their life, and share other natural modalities to supplement their healthy lifestyle if you have the training.
  • Empower clients to achieve improved health through addressing any imbalances caused by a lack of quality sleep, adequate pure water, exercise, fresh air, and relaxation.
  • Help clients to evaluate their lifestyle choices to identify and change any potential causes of ill health and create a wellness plan.

But remember, unless you have previous qualifications and training as a Registered Aromatherapist (RA), you are not a licensed physician. You must be vigilant and aware of the current legislation in your state on the practice of aromatherapy.

Here are a few basic things that an RA cannot do:

  • Diagnose disease. An aromatherapist will always refer clients back to their primary care physicians for a diagnosis if necessary.
  • Treat disease. An aromatherapist’s focus is on health and education, not on disease.
  • Prescribe drugs or pharmaceuticals. Aromatherapists teach clients about essential oils.
  • Perform invasive procedures. Depending on training and licensing, a natural health practitioner may use hands-on techniques, like reflexology.
  • Practice unsafe administration techniques such as Raindrop Therapy or Raindrop Technique.

Step 10 – Maintain Your Credential with Continuing Education

Now that you have your RA credential, it’s important to meet the continuing education requirements. Here are a few things to remember in order to maintain eligibility as a Registered Aromatherapist (RA):

  • Registration is recognized for a maximum period of five years.
  • To maintain Registration, you must be in compliance with the ARC Disciplinary Policy.
  • You must also be in compliance with other ARC standards, policies, and procedures.

After five years, you can…

  • Either retake and pass the then-current Registration Examination or meet continuing education requirements (see information below).
  • All RAs are responsible for maintaining continuing education records used for the Application.
  • Complete the renewal form.
  • List all continuing education activities.
  • Pay the $325 renewal fee.
  • Download your Reregistration Application here:http://www.ptcny.com/clients/ARC/#Reregistration%20Information

To remain eligible for RA registration with continuing education requirements, remember that:

  • 100 contact hours are equal to 100 actual continuing education hours.
  • Hours must be provided by any approved educational body or organization, or by a NAHA- or AIA-approved school or educator.
  • Training in Raindrop Therapy or Raindrop Technique does not count as this is not approved as a safe administration method by ARC.

Here are some options for completing your continuing education requirement. All events must be related to aromatherapy:

  • Workshops
  • Seminars
  • Professional development offerings
  • Online or on-campus courses
  • State or national conferences
  • The preparation and presentation of a professional education topic relevant to aromatherapy
  • An original article written by the candidate and published in a professional journal such as the International Journal of Professional Holistic Aromatherapy (IJPHA)

arc_logo

Aromatherapists have been taking the Registration Examination since its inception, and the number of Registered Aromatherapists (RA) continues to grow, even spreading across the globe. There are RAs in China, France, Hong Kong, Singapore Japan, Korea, and the United States.

At the American College, students from all over the world have successfully completed their ACHS aromatherapy program and passed the ARC Examination and received the “RA” distinction. In fact, ACHS Aromatherapy graduates have a 100% success rate over five-years (2009-2013).

There are tremendous benefits to becoming a Registered Aromatherapist (RA). This credential helps reinforce a standard of excellence and safety in the profession of aromatherapy, and I am encouraged that more and more aromatherapists join the registry each year.

This post first appeared on the blog of the American College of Healthcare Sciences on January 29, 2015. Reprinted with permission.

Dorene Petersen is the Founder, President, CEO, and Principal of the American College of Healthcare Sciences (ACHS). She has over 35 years clinical teaching and lecturing experience in aromatherapy and other holistic health subjects. She has presented papers on essential oils and clinical aromatherapy at the International Federation of Essential Oils and Aroma Trades Annual Conference (IFEAT) in California, USA; the Aroma Environment Association of Japan (AEAJ) in Tokyo, Japan; the Asian Aroma Ingredients Congress (AAIC) and Expo in Bali, Indonesia; the International Center of Advanced Aromatherapy (ICAA) at the WonGwang Digital University in Seoul, Korea; as well as the AAIC Expo in Kunming, Yunnan, China. Dorene currently serves as Chair of the Aromatherapy Registration Council (ARC), and she is also active with the Distance Education Training Council (DETC). Dorene is a travel junkie, and she hopes you will join her for the ACHS Study Abroad Program in Indonesia and India in 2015!

Product Review: LabAroma

AnalysingTheBlends_homeWhen I heard about LabAroma I couldn’t resist the temptation take a look at the website. Being a bit of a closet techie it looked like something that would be fun to use and valuable for anyone doing lots of blending. The website is wonderfully simple in layout and easy to navigate. There is a short video and lots of information explaining all about LabAroma and how it works. An opportunity arose for me to try it so I jumped at the chance and I certainly wasn’t disappointed.

Armed with loads of questions, I made a start! The programme continues the clean and clear layout on the front page of the website. I managed to work out how to use the blending tools without reading the instructions. It is simple and intuitive, but for the complete technophobe there are easy to follow instructions. The video tutorial is now available for anyone who prefers to see it done.  I tried the programme on various tech—laptop, notebook, tablet and my Blackberry—and it adjusted to the screen size for each and worked well across all the platforms. I didn’t try it on an Apple device but would expect it to work the same. 

The process to formulate a blend is simple – you select the essential oil from the palette and drag it across to the ‘My Blend’ section. You can add as many as you want. If you’re going for a really complicated blend you can add limitless essential oils. Next comes the slightly tricky bit! You then add the percentage required for each essential oil in the blend.  I did ponder if a ratio option could be added here or a calculator using drops for people who don’t like percentages or fractions. When you’re happy with your percentages, click “calculate” and it works it out for you. There are options to start again or add more if you’re not happy with the blend. 

The blend you have created is displayed as a pie chart with the chemical breakdown listed. This can be saved as a .pdf, printed or added to the ‘My Blends’ area. I loved this option as it means I could have gas chromatigraph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) data sheets for the blends that I supply as part of my schools’ work. I could also play around with the percentages to see if I could create a more effective blend. On the LabAroma+ option the Safety data/warnings about the blend are displayed for various countries: EU, Australia, USA and Japan. This option, although quite a bit more expensive would be invaluable to anyone making products for the retail market. There is also an effect section which lists in descending order the body systems that the blend would be effective in treating. This would be great when blending for more than one condition.

There is an option to add your own oils if you have the GC/MS breakdown. If the components aren’t currently listed you can request for it to be added. I learned they would be adding and updating the oils on a regular basis. Be aware that when selecting the essential oils you can only see the common names. I missed Cistus on the first look through as it is listed as Rock Rose. This isn’t a great problem and it would probably complicate the clean buttons for each oil. You can select each oil button and get a GC/MS data reading. The profiles for the individual oils are still to be added at the time of writing this review.

Another feature is the search by component feature. You can carry out a search by setting up a less or greater than percentage field for a component. You can specify more than one component which gives really precise results. There’s also a blog on the website and an option to sign up for the newsletter.

When I had finished my trial I had answered all of my initial questions. Although the initial purchase may seem a bit expensive, I can see that it would save lots of time and become an invaluable tool for any practitioner who does a lot of blending. I wish it had been around when I had trained; I will be recommending it to my students. It is simple to use, and gives results that are easy to view and utilise without you getting bogged down with loads of tech or research. From me it gets a thumbs up!

Enter to win a free 1 year subscription to LabAroma!                                                   The competition ends January 31, 2014. Send a brief (140 Character) of your favorite essential oil and a description of why you love it and what you use it for to aroma@labaroma.com. The profile descriptions will feature in LabAroma and be credited to the contributor. Each profile description given will enter the contributor into a drawing to win a years subscription to LabAroma. Enter as often as you like!  www.labaroma.com

This review was written by UK Aromatherapist Anita James and appears in the Spring Issue of the IJPHA (Vol. 2, Issue 4). www.ijpha.com

For information about Antia James visit http://essentiallyholistic-onlinetraining.com/essentially-holistic

Grateful for 2013 and Eager to Welcome 2014!

2014 wish

2013 has been a wonderful year for the IJPHA!  We have increased the number of subscribers 45%.  We welcomed a new annual sponsor the American College of Healthcare Sciences and retained our sponsors Aromahead Institute of Aromatherapy and Appalachian Valley Natural Products who have been with us since our first issue in June 2012.

What began as a 44-page exploration into lesser-known essential oils and their professional use in aromatherapy has grown.  Our last issue (Volume 2 Issue 3) featuring Agarwood and Mastic essential oils was a very full 64 pages of in-depth information!  We have received positive responses from more of the industry experts you have requested to write articles for the IJPHA.  We are simultaneously working on all of the issues for 2014 at this time!

The IJPHA was represented well around the world in 2013.  In June, we were at the PhytArom conference in Grasse, France and later at the Annual General Meeting of the International Federation of Professional Aromatherapists (IFPA) in Hinckley, England.  In September, the IJPHA booth drew a lot of attention and many new subscriber at the Alliance of International Aromatherapists (AIA) International Conference and Wellness Expo in St. Petersburg, Florida.  October found us in Kumamoto, Japan at the 16th annual conference of the Japanese Society of Aromatherapy.  And while we couldn’t be in two places at once, IJPHA materials were on hand at the International Aromatherapy and Aromatic Medicine Conference (IAAMA) in Australia in September and also at the International Federation of Professional Aromatherapists (IFPA) conference in England in October where we gained new subscribers.

The number of followers has grown on our facebook  and blog pages too!  Welcome to all our new followers and thank you to those of you who continue to pass on your positive comments to your friends and colleagues  in support of the IJPHA.

As always we welcome your suggestions and case studies!  Your input helps to shape future issues.  If you haven’t already done so, please visit our website at www.ijpha.com and complete the survey to let us know how we are doing and what you would like to see more of in the IJPHA.  Case studies remain the number one request of our readers.  In order for aromatherapy to grow as a respected healthcare modality we need to add to the growing pool of research and information.  Your case studies add to the growing body of knowledge.  Many practitioners are hesitant to submit their case studies for publication because of they have never published anything before.  Several practitioners have welcomed the challenge of writing for a peer-reviewed journal and are happy to have gone through the experience. We welcome you to contact some of our contributors to learn about their experience.  Many are open to receive your inquiries.

Since the IJPHA’s inception we have seen an increase in the size of the journal, and more importantly the postage.  The increase in postal rates was felt more in our international subscriptions where the average cost of shipping increased more than $8 per year.  The IJPHA however did not increase the cost of a subscription.  As of January 1, 2014 there will be another yet another price increase from the U.S. Postal Service.  While it is more costly, our subscribers tell us they really appreciate the IJPHA because it is available in print format.  However the IJPHA will need to increase the subscription rate ($5 domestic/$10 international) to cover the expense of shipping starting with the 2014-2015 subscription year.  You can save by subscribing before January 30th!

As always, we remain grateful for your support of the IJPHA and your participation in the aromatic community.  May 2014 bring you much joy and prosperity!

Book Review: Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Edition

EO Safety

Essential Oil Safety, 2nd edition                                                                                                     By Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young PhD

It has been 12 years since the original edition of “Essential Oil Safety” was published. In that time the world of essential oils has changed rapidly, this work reflecting those changes in a highly critical and comprehensive manner.

When I first opened the second edition and browsed the contents, there was only one word that came to mind – ‘WOW’! As a lecturer in Aromatic Medicine and a formulator,  the chemistry of essential oils is an integral part of my day-to-day working life.  This work has become my go-to reference for toxicity data, drug interactions, regulatory body recommendations and so much more.

The meticulous level of detail that both authors have achieved is easily seen when browsing the essential oil profiles which have been expanded from 95 to 400 (including many newer essential oils such as Fragonia and Honey Myrtle). Each profile now includes detailed constituent chemistry data, safety hazard data from various sources including the EU and IFRA, regulatory guidelines for safe and appropriate usage, organ specific and systemic effects plus general comments. The inclusion of chemotypes of commonly used species, such as Niaouli, Rosemary and Thyme, is a useful feature for both formulators and therapists alike.

The new organ system specific chapters are a goldmine of information for therapists wishing to gain a deeper understanding of the interaction of aromatic compounds with the human organism. Sensible, balanced information is given in a highly readable format about some fairly heavy subject matter. This clear, easy-to-read style of information delivery is a testament to the authors and editors commitment to the target audience making this an ideal addition to course textbook lists.

When it comes to the chemical constituent profiles, these too have been expanded in a similarly detailed manner. Natural sources of each constituent >1% are listed facilitating easy substitutions during formulating. Pharmacokinetic, dermal and oral LD50 data along with the neurotoxicity and mutagenicity/genotoxicity data make this section extremely important to pharmaceutical, perfumery and cosmetic formulators.

For food and beverage scientists this work is of equal importance as it covers the regulatory guidelines for both essential oils and isolated constituents, the suggested oral doses and any known adverse side effects.

One would expect this new, hugely expanded 2nd edition to have a similarly expanded price tag, but surprisingly the new edition is currently being offered by most book sellers for less than its predecessor.

This work is a must-have reference for anyone working with essential oils or their constituents regardless of profession or level of knowledge. If you only purchase one new referenced text this year, spend your money wisely and grab this long awaited and much-needed reference work.

This book review written by Mark Webb, BSc, MASCC appears in the International Journal of Professional Holistic Aromatherapy Volume 2 Issue 3

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